Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Red Ass; or, the Arkansas Red Butt



Hook:

10-16
Thread:

Red
Tip:

Silk buttonhole twist - Coats & Clark's 184, red, size D
Body:

Peacock herl
Hackle:

Partridge



L. J. DeCuir lists the Red Ass as the Arkansas Red Butt in his Southeastern Flies (2000), noting that “peacock herl flies have always been good producers on the mountain streams of the Southeast and this one is no exception. This pattern is from Jerry Cobb. He’s had great success with it on the streams in the higher elevations in the Smokies as well as the Northern Arkansas trout streams.” DeCuir dressed it as a heavily hackled wet fly:

“Hook: Mustad 3906, TMC 3976 #8-16
Thread: Red
Tag: Red thread
Body: Peacock herl
Hackle: Partridge tied as a wet fly collar
Head: Red thread built up fairly heavily”

DeCuir points out that the Arkansas Red Butt works equally well on trout in Southern Appalachian mountains or the tailraces of east Tennessee as it does on panfish and bass in farm ponds and warm water impoundments.

Cobb’s combination of peacock herl, red thread, and a black and white barred hackling recalls dressings like the Gray Hackle Peacock and its precedents; dressed without a tip, the fly bears a strong resemblance to Sylvester Neme's Syl's Nymph.

6 comments:

  1. Very nice work Neil! Red, peacock herl, and partridge are always a good combination for a small mountain stream fly.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Mark - the small mountain streams are the only place I've tried it, although I've heard good stories about tailrace fishing, too. A few people posted their stories to the fly posting on my Facebook page and the Facebook Fly Tying group page.

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  2. Just wanted to add that this fly is very effective out West also. Many a Rocky Mountain stream trout have taken this type pattern. Even more so in the lakes and stillwaters here too. Thanks, Neil, time to restock my box.

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    1. Good to hear it's successful in so many diverse places, Mel. Cheers!

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  3. Love the blog, as I've been a Leisenring fan for years. I've been looking for Corticelli silk buttonhole twist #3315 forever, haha! Have you fished the Brodheads? Gosh you have a tremendous grasp on the history of the wet fly. I'm a big Hill fan too so I can relate to many of the old fly fishers you allude to in your posts. Hello from the Adirondacks. If you are on Twitter find me @paulkalac. Have a great holiday!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Paul - I've never had the chance to fish the Brodheads. In fact, I've never been farther north than Virginia or farther south than east Tennessee. I hope you've a great holiday, as well

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